What’s so hard about Peace?

A series of conversations between
Nobel Peace Prize winners and some
of the most celebrated artists for our time.

The Nobel Peace Prize recipients are extraordinary individuals who have had a significant and positive impact on our world, often at great personal risk and sacrifice.

WHAT’S SO HARD ABOUT PEACE?, a soon to be released documentary series, brings these larger than life figures to millions of viewers worldwide.

We travel on this voyage of discovery with some of today’s most recognized and respected artists.

 

What's so hard about Peace?

What’s so hard about Peace?

A series of conversations between
Nobel Peace Prize winners and some
of the most celebrated artists for our time.

The Nobel Peace Prize recipients are extraordinary individuals who have had a significant and positive impact on our world, often at great personal risk and sacrifice.

WHAT’S SO HARD ABOUT PEACE?, a soon to be released documentary series, brings these larger than life figures to millions of viewers worldwide.

We travel on this voyage of discovery with some of today’s most recognized and respected artists.

What’s so hard about Peace?

Overview

Amid two decades of violence and confusion, and rising tides of hatred and fear, where can the world turn for truth and reason?

The Nobel Peace Prize laureates. Voices of sanity amidst the chaos.

They, more than any other group, harbor the wisdom — based on hard experience, courage, and the uncommon gift of foresight — that can help move us from conflict to resolution. If we are a global village, they truly are our village elders.

But few people can name more than one or two of the laureates, much less understand their work and accomplishments. How many know, for instance, that the reason we no longer hear about the Sandinistas and Contras is that Oscar Arias Sanchez brought the leaders of Central American together with the Arias Peace Plan? How many know that the Tunisian National Dialogue Quartet, winners of the 2015 Nobel Peace Prize, brought Tunisia, the birthplace of the Arab Spring, back from the brink of civil war with an Islamist government, putting their country on the road to a pluralist, democratic society?

WHAT’S SO HARD ABOUT PEACE?, a documentary series produced by Mary Wald and TheCommunity.com, brings these peacemakers to light, by introducing and revealing them through personal dialogue with artists we know and respect.

These WHAT’S SO HARD ABOUT PEACE? documentaries are not news stories, exposés or political commentaries. They are relaxed, compelling, personal conversations about the lives of these very special people. Our artist do not just interview the laureates. They engage them and show us what makes these peacemakers tick.

It is our hope that WHAT’S SO HARD ABOUT PEACE will inspire some viewers to become peacemakers themselves. Seeing these large figures as human beings – people you could really sit and have a conversation with – should show the viewer that it does not take a super being to change the world for the better. Ideally, the viewers will come away thinking, “Maybe I can do something too.”

Production

Three interviews have been filmed for the series:

Paul Simon traveled to India to interview His Holiness the Dalai Lama in his home in Dharamsala.

This warm, personal discussion covers the root causes of violence, the role of ethics and religion, media responsibility, the definition of wealth and more.

Michael Douglas has interviewed nuclear scientist Joseph Rotblat, who in 1939 was one of the earliest nuclear scientists. Joseph Rotblat worked on the Manhattan Project designing the atomic bomb. He resigned from the project and spent the next fifty years working to abolish nuclear weapons. Dr. Rotblat passed away since this interview was taped. This is one of his last interviews. He was at the time the last surviving signatory of the Bertrand Russell – Albert Einstein Manifesto, which highlighted the dangers posed by nuclear weapons and called for world leaders to seek peaceful resolutions to international conflict.

Bono has interviewed former President of the USSR, Mikhail Gorbachev, in Turin, Italy. Topics include his influences (his mother and Raisa), religious freedom in the Soviet Union, the disarmament negotiations with President Reagan and more.

Previews

Contact Us

email: nobelvoices@gmail.com
phone (209)286-8050

For more information on the team: thecommunity.com

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